Monthly Archives: May 2008

Summer Reading List

OK, I leave for five weeks in a week. Its mostly vacation, but I am looking forward to spending some time reading some of the dense social theory or social science books that I rely on, but have never finished or even read (ouch, hurts to admit that in print). I’ll probably get drummed out of the bidness (its like our omerta) for saying this, but when you read lots of journal article,s you start to know what are the foundational texts and how they are used. Its like seeing the shape of a plane by its shadow. Foucault, is, I think a classic in this regard. Everyone cites, few have actually read (beyond strategic skimming). And Weber. (Although I did take a grad school seminar where we did nothing but read Economy and Society. That’s a story for another time).

Anyway, for the sake of _actually_ reading some of these from my ever-expanding list of books, I am limiting myself to two. So, this is the fun part, like choosing courses from a stellar menu. Which two?

Possible summer reading list (In Progress):

  • Identity and Control by Harrison White
  • Sociology of Philosophy by Randall Collins
  • Constitution of Society by Anthony Giddens
  • Volumes 2 and 3 of The Information Age by Manuel Castells
  • The Hacker Ethic By Pekka Hinamen
  • something by Bourdieu…
  • Brokerage and Closure by Ron Burt
  • Something by Charles Tilly, Big structures, large processes, huge comparisons or Identities, Boundaries and Social Ties
  • Code v 2.0 by Lawrence Lessig
  • The Hacker Ethic by Pekka Himanen (for  teaching really).
Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Castells, New Projects, organization studies, organization theory, Orgs Stuff (theory, science, studies), Social Networks, social theory

Chain letters explained…

nsf.gov – News – How Did That Chain Letter Get To My Inbox? – US National Science Foundation NSF
Everyone who has an e-mail account has probably received a forwarded chain letter promising good luck if the message is forwarded on to others–or terrible misfortune if it isnt. The sheer volume of forwarded messages such as chain letters, online petitions, jokes and other materials leads to a simple question–how do these messages reach so many people so quickly?

The NSF research by Jon Kleinberg (From Six Degrees book) and David Liben-Nowell (from Carleton!) has an interesting answer.  It seems that online petitions follow quite circuitous routes and do not spread virally (each recipient spawning new ones) at all.  Key nodes are critical making the whole process quite resistant to prediction and intervention.  Bad news for people selling you the Dummies Guide to Viral Marketing.

Leave a comment

Filed under activism, Marketing, Network Dynamics, Networks, Research

Last Chance to Apply to Be an Obama Organizing Fellow!

Maybe some current or former students check in…

Maybe this campaign is going to be a case study in managerialism in politics married to netroots.  Centrally controlled message and tight finances (managerialism) with people2peole tools and emergent organizing on the ground (netroots).  so, this counts as an OT post also.  :<)

Barack Obama : : Change We Can Believe In | Sam Graham-Felsen’s Blog: Last Chance to Apply to Be an Obama Organizing Fellow!
Today is your last chance to apply to be an Obama Organizing Fellow this summer. This is your opportunity to be on the frontlines of this movement for change, bringing Obama’s message to voters across America, precinct by precinct, block by block…

3 Comments

Filed under activism, management, Org Design, Orgs Stuff (theory, science, studies), Politics, Power, Activism, Social Networks

Applied SNA-ASNA 2007 // Call for Papers

ASNA 2007 // Call for Papers
ASNA 2008 will primarily provide an interdisciplinary venue with focus on applications of social network analysis; however, submissions on theoretical and methodological issues regarding SNA are also welcome.

I don’t know how many times I can bounce over to the EU in the Fall, but this looked interesting.  I have been itching for awhile to get a better handle on applied SNA.   Outside of Valdis Kreb’s InFlow and Rob Cross’ Network Roundtable (and The company Visible Path), I don’t know much about applied SNA over here.

I should find out what kinds of meetings are over here of this nature.

Leave a comment

Filed under conferences, management, Network Visuals, Research, Social Networks

Brief hiatus

As the boys at NPR’s “Its all Politics” podcast like to say:

To the fan of this blog. Be patient. I appreciate your patronage. I am immersed in several academic writing projects.

I’ll be back in a few weeks. Meanwhile, enjoy the archives!

Leave a comment

Filed under writing

Blau Exchange: Charles Tilly Interview

This was a treat to find.  And reassuring as it is basically the trajectory I am trying to follow.

Blau Exchange: Charles Tilly Interview
Paul DiPerna:

If you have any advice for the next generation of scholars and researchers in the social sciences, what would you like to tell them?
Charles Tilly:

Don’t get blindsided by neuroscience, which is going to make individualistic, brain-centered accounts of human behavior even more popular for the next ten years or so. Anticipate the following phase, when even the neuroscientists will begin to recognize the importance of social interaction in the formation of individuals.
Paul DiPerna:

Along similar lines…. if you have any hopes for the next generation of scholars, what would you like to ask of them?
Charles Tilly:

Figure out how to do relational analyses that provide valid explanations of individual behavior and are accessible (at least in simplified form) to readers outside of social science.

Leave a comment

Filed under Great Quotations, Networks, Scholars, social theory, sociology

New journal outlet for me?

This came over the transom:

Management Revue, with a long tradition as a German language journal, is opening up to an international audience. Now under new editors, Management Revue is using a novel concept as a European journal.

Well, that is great!  The upcoming CFP on power may be particularly compelling.

Leave a comment

Filed under organization studies, organization theory, Research, social theory