Category Archives: Bucknell

Nodes and Notes (I’ve Died and Gone to Heaven)

So, a Senior, who took my “Six Degrees” foundation seminar many years ago is a dancer.  She tells me she is choreographing a piece that will link the idea of connectedness and thresholds into a dance piece in March.

Specifically, she wants to express the idea that the little things we do can spread and ripple out across the world, a world bound up by far-flung networks that still have short paths.  She didn’t quite say that, but that is where she was headed.  Like, not “just the six degree effect” she said.

I’ve died and gone to heaven.  This is the perfect intersection of my love for music and for netcentric thinking.

Of course, I immediately thought of the great John Guare play, Six Degrees of Separation.  (Yeah Wendy West for directing it back at Carleton!).

She is interested in spoken word OR music.  I started an RDIO playlist of ideas.  I’ll add more.
And of course, I’ll be sure to ask the good folks at SOCNET, still the lifeblood of much netcentric talk and thought.

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Filed under Bucknell, digital culture, economic sociology, Network Society, Networks

D’Souza is a Travesty of an Analyst… and I have to let go of that…

Dinesh D’souza is speaking in a week here.  A student club is bringing him.  He is a travesty to literary analysis as he bases his whole “Obama wants to destroy America” on a wacky reading of Obama’s book.  I would get nothing out of going and challenging him.  But it irks me no one else might not.

Link to talk: http://susquehannavalleyconservatives.com/community-corner/

Stanley Fish says what I would like to: “This is disappointing. While a viewer could certainly disagree with D’Souza’s analysis of the genesis and emergence of Obama’s views, it is nevertheless an analysis to which one could respond in the usual spirit of intellectual debate by saying things like “you’ve left something out” or “you draw your conclusion too quickly.” But as the movie picks up polemical speed, philosophy, political theory and psychology are left behind and replaced by name-calling, and by a name-calling that brings D’Souza close to positions he rejects. For instance, he rejects birtherism, the contention that Obama was born in Kenya and is hence not an American citizen; but he replaces it with a back-door, or metaphorical, birtherism when he characterizes Obama as an alien being, as a fifth-column party of one who has pretended to be an American, and technically is one, but really is something else.”  http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/27/obama-dsouza-and-anti-colonialism/

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Filed under Bucknell, Politics, Power, Activism, Scholars

Town-Gown Project for Planned Development

This piece from the NYT caught my eye.  Lewisburg is similar in some ways, although bigger.  Kelly township is already up and running as sprawl-driven growth.  The whole county, Union, is involved in a planning process, called cultivating community.  There are some draft plans on the website.  How effectively can it redirect te built in infrastructure and private development?

The great quote here is the professor: “a synthesis of academics and civics.”

Maybe Bucknell has faculty or classes who could engage in similar research? Does the county need or want such help?

Vermont Town Turns to College in Bid to Guide Change – NYTimes.com
Starksboro asked students from nearby Middlebury College to spend the semester interviewing its residents to document what they value most about the place. It intends to use their thoughts to influence decisions about its future.

In particular, officials here are counting on the project to help steer a revision of the town plan next year, a process that often leads to zoning-change proposals that incite bitter debate.

“The key is to project beyond immediate controversies over applications for subdivisions and to say, ‘Let’s envision the future that we would love to have,’ ” said Prof. John Elder of Middlebury, “at which point there is considerable agreement.”

The students are in a class called Portrait of a Vermont Town, which Professor Elder, who teaches it, described as a rare synthesis of academics and civics.

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Filed under Bucknell, Government, pedagogy

Classes begin…

Classes have begun.  Blogging goes down.  I’ll have to see what happeened to the statistics.

I am teaching a Foudnation seminar called “Six Degrees of Separation” and an upper level Management course called Management 335 “Changing Organizations.”

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Filed under Bucknell, higher education, pedagogy

Focus the Nation: Bucknell and Climate Change

Here is the list of events for this Bucknell Event in January.

Focus the Nation, Bucknell University

Schedule of Events

Wednesday, January 30th. 2008

– 5pm, Campus Theater: “The 11th Hour”, new climate documentary by Leonardo DiCaprio

Thursday, January 31st, 2008: Focus the Nation Teach-In

– Interdisciplinary Discussion Panels (Harvey Powers Theater, Coleman): four professors on each panel, all talking about/discussion a specific issue related to global climate change. Panels and participants are:

Session 1: “Obstacles to Change(8:00 am – 9:22 am)

Raymond (Chemical Engineering): “The Current state of our climate”

Siewers (English): “Philosophy of our relationship with nature”

Buonopane (Civil Engineering): “Building design and energy use”

Kochel/Trop (Geology): “(Un) Control of nature”

Session 2: “Tipping Points” (9:30 am -10:52 pm)

Stamos (Economics) – “When cost becomes prohibitive”

Wilshusen (Environmental Studies) – “When public opinion changes”

Searles (Anthropology/Sociology): “When our behavior threatens an entire people: case study on the Inuit”

Tranquillo (Biomedical Engineering): “When small changes have a global impact: non-linear relationships”

Session 3: “Can we afford not to stop global warming?” (1:00 pm– 2:22 pm)

Shrivastava (Management) – “Overview”

DiStefano* (History) – “Historical Response to Environmental Crisis”

Wooden (Environmental Studies) – “Winners and Losers”

Pizzorno (Biology) – “Role of Climate Change in Spreading Disease”

Session 4: “Motivating Action” (2:30 pm – 3:52 pm)

Grant (Theater): “The role of art and theater in social movements”

Antonacio (Religion): “Our Moral Obligation”

Unal (Economics): “Changing our current political economy”

Hendry (Management): “Responsible Investment/Conscious Consumerism”

– 11am-1pm: Campus Sustainability Celebration (Fieldhouse): Student bands, environmental research posters, nature-related art and humanities expo, sustainable business/industry expo, and more!

– 4-5pm (Harvey Powers Theater): Nonpartisan, intergenerational discussion between leading environmental students and invited elected officials on campus about what the state and country are doing to address Global Climate Change

– 730-830pm (Trout Auditorium, Vaughn Lit building): Keynote address by Andrew Revkin, lead reported on global climate change and environmental issues for the New York Times

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Filed under activism, Bucknell, climate change, pedagogy