Category Archives: ethics

7 UU principles even more concisely…

The 7 principles are:

  • The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  • Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
  • Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  • A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  • The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  • The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  • Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

If I could, I’d make them:

We believe

  1. All people inherently can do good, act from love, and possess a right to conscience, and so
  2. Truth and meaning are discoveries on your journey; also
  3. All relations  are infused with justice and compassion.  Then,
  4. All congregations should accept and encourage your spiritual growth and
  5. All congregations, communities, and nations must use democracy because
  6. We can envision a world overflowing with peace, liberty, and justice for all and
  7. A world where we are mindful caretakers of the interdependent web enmeshing all life.

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Filed under ethics, religion

SOCNET discussion on miltary and ethics (2 polls)

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Filed under ethics, higher education, Military, Research, Scholars, Social Networks

Army Social Scientists Calm Afghanistan, Make Enemies at Home

Tanks again to Valdis Krebs for pushing this out to SOCNET.

Army Social Scientists Calm Afghanistan, Make Enemies at Home
Each team is getting a half-dozen laptops, a satellite dish and software for social network analysis, so they can diagram how all of the important players in an area are connected. Digital timelines will mark key cultural and political events. Mapmaking programs will plot out the economic, ethnic and tribal landscape.

I wonder what this history of the US military is in terms of using social scientists.  I remember one of my grad school professors, Steve Nock, talked about how some of the early advance in statistics and social surveys grew out of studies of morale in WWII.  What happened in Viet Nam?  Were their cultural or social scientists there?  Why is the military resistant to this kind of expertise?  Because it may humanize potential enemies?  But don’t effective commanders at the ground level become amateur social scientists anyway?

What are the ethical concerns about using this technology for war making?  I recall the American Psychological Associations’s controversy over the role of psychologists in detainees, interrogation, and torture.  For story, here.  For APA controversy, here.

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Filed under ethics, Military, national security, policy, Social Networks, Torture