Category Archives: participatory technology

Scholarship 2.0: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

I am not an innovator, but maybe a first or late first adopter.   Of course, it varies by network too. At my university, I seem to be clearly an early adopter of many collaborative technologies (blogs, wikis, virtual worlds).  Anyway, this blog came up and seemed to be worth exploring further as my own scholarly work about Web 2.0/living web also takes on living web forms.

Mitchell Waldrop, coincidentally, is also the author of Complexity which is one of my favorite books and indirectly influenced my choices of scholarly interests in grad school and beyond.

This is a stub until I can look at the blog more.

Scholarship 2.0: An Idea Whose Time Has Come: <strong>Science 2.0</strong>
Scholarship 2.0 is devoted to describing and documenting the forms, facets, and features of alternative Web-based scholarly publishing philosophies and practices. The variety of old and new metrics available for assessing the impact, significance, and value of Web-based scholarship is of particular interest.

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Filed under Living Web, participatory technology, Research, Scholars, science, technology

The Big Question and lots of answers!

 The Big Question

Strangely addictive.   They have questions form anyone, especially young folks.  Different experts post an answer.  Its like a hybrid wikipedia-britannica.

My fave is “How long would it take you to ride a chicken around the world?”

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Filed under digital culture, humor, Living Web, participatory technology, Research

Living Web Social Innovation

Yesterday, I listened to most of Nick Yeo’s conversation over at the social innovation center’s conversations network.  He is the communications director for Taking ITGlobal, a youth- and development-oriented social networking pllatform.

One thing that stood out (and that I think Vishant might like) is that he discussed how they discovered that their users in places like Africa were often huddled five or six aroudn a computer using the site, and they thought of ways to cross leverage that liittle face2face net with the networking of their platform.

Their official elevator pitch:

TakingITGlobal.org is an online community that connects youth to find inspiration, access information, get involved, and take action in their local and global communities. It’s the world’s most popular online community for young people interested in making a difference, with hundreds of thousands of unique visitors each month.

The other link is to google.org.   Read this in Fast Company’s Fast list for 2008.  They seem to combine corporate philanthropy, R&D, and wiki-type decision making (letting lots of people propose and rank ideas for grants and investing).  Also interesting to see that Hal Varian, whose book Network Rules was one of the better strategy books i read at IESE, is their chief economist.

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Filed under activism, digital culture, Network Society, Networks, participatory technology, Politics, Power, Activism, social bookmarking

Social Networking and Business

Peter Durand asked this question over at linkedin.

I thought to myself, “I should be able to say something about this.” Here is my first crack. I think its ok. Its helpful to have someone with a practical question ask it to get me to focus.

My initial response raises more questions (which I’ll return to at the end.)

What is the most effective way for a professional service firm to use social networking apps? (After all quantity of connections does not equal quality.)

(1) What are the business goals behind the use of social networking Web 2.0 apps such as LinkedIn, Plaxo and Facebook?
(2) As volume of connections increase, how can integrity and authenticity be maintained?
(3) And, most tricky, how can the business value of social networking apps be described to senior leaders who tend to operate on the other side of the technology gap?

Great questions. I need to have good answers for myself. Some quick hits.

1) The goal for any particular business must be part of an overall approach to customers and relationship management. However, if a given business seeks or has one way, firm to customer communication, they will find lots of conflicts because most SNS have reciprocity built into them.
2) Facebook is an interesting case. Due to its initial growth exclusively through college domain name emails (bubba@college.edu) college students flocked to it creating a “network effect.” A network effect is when a product becomes more valuable as the network of users increases. The value of a carrot to me is not affected by the number of carrot owners. The value of fax machine goes up as more people have them. But, now that Facebook has thrown itself open, will the attractiveness of network effects offset the negatives of the lower baseline trustworthiness of the average user. The second half of that sentence is the predator fear. On MySpace, due to its low threshold for authenticating users, I don’t know who is a predator so newbies are vulnerable and power users are wary.

3) Short answer: how do they feel about this: Cluetrain.com elevator pitch. If they feel threatened, don’t bother. If they feel invigorated, than explain that SNS are a way to have more conversations between you and any one of your customers/stakeholders.

If that seems like too much of a cop out, especially for decision makers who feel threatened by conversations but can be convinced otherwise, I might try this.

Markets are about conversations. Even when you don’t see or monitor those conversations, it is the most natural form of communicating. In a brand-intense, information saturated economy, conversations are even more important, and the new scarcity, the new value driver is “real” conversations. For more and more people, they are choosing to substitute many-to-many forms of communication for the older one-to-many. That is the difference between a radio ad and a blog, between mass media and wiki media. We are not “adding” SNS to our lives, we are building our lives around them, and adding TV, print, radio as we need or want to.

Peter’s Blog response.

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Filed under Business, Networks, participatory technology, Social Network Sites

Really taking advantage of New Media for Democracy

I just found this in the NYT: several experts discussing how new and old media can be used to improve debates.

I haven’t read all, but two stood out (Teachout’s and Rasiej and Sifry’s) .  They centered and participation, inetractivity,a nd asynchrony of new media.  Like, having candidates provide answers of any length on questions.  Having candidates debate each o ther one v one and leave each hour on a site for public to browse as they like.  Having public vote on questions.  Instead of CNN planting questions.

Bev may want to see this.

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Filed under Information and Communication Technology, participatory technology, Politics, Power, Activism