Category Archives: Living Web

To Wiki or not to Wiki?

Write this email to Bryan Alexander over at NITLE to see if his input could help me make a quick dicision about “to wiki or not to wiki?”

I am thinking of trying to use a wiki for two projects.

1)      Organize the ever more cluttered and bushy set of resources i would like to draw on in my teaching.  I have been a pack rat for awhile with both print and electronic resources.   When it comes time to dip into this pool to build syllabi, I tend to ignore it as it is hard to access.  I was imagining that a wiki could help me combine tags or a folksonomy with links and some brief commentary.

2)      As a collaborative tool in a class I am about to teach on organization theory.  The plan is to have students and myself educate ourselves on  the financial crisis and work together to find out “what went on.”  I though a wiki could be used to build knowledge and resources.

My university has Blackboard and there is a wiki tool there.

I was wondering if you have any thoughts about wiki tools or platforms.  Is there one good one for academics?  Is there an “industry leader” out there?

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Filed under Living Web, pedagogy, technology

Blogging and Democracy of the blog media- 2nd Guardian Column

I think the title for my Guardian Column (they don’t seem to update the site) is “Our Online Selves.”  That can be improved.

Here is the second installment.

“The End of Culture and Truth?”

I am a blogger.  Eight years ago, saying this might have conjured up someone doing something disdainful with their finger and nose, or some fascinating example of a field position in some strange British idea of a sport.  But now, most people recognize that I maintain a web-published journal or log (“blog” is a contraction of Web-log).  Why would I or anyone else write publish a personal journal on the web?  Who do we think we are, anyway?  Great unwashed masses clogging the for a with our swollen egos.  Like so much on the Internet, from the amusing video of Mentos and Diet Coke (google it!) to archives of Saturday morning cartoon characters, the common response is “Who has the time?”

A friend of mine, a professor, told me off-handedly: “I don’t read blogs.  I don’t have time for anyone’s unfinished writing.”  I was spluttering with annoyance at such a narrow perspective of blogs and blogging.  I have kids so I get the “no time” complaint.  But unfinished writing?  Surely he has heard the idea that no writing is ever finished meaning that all his favorite classics were also “unfinished writing.”  Who knows what undiscovered Shakespeares and Toni Morrisons are out there?  I think what he really meant was that he preferred writing that had already been vetted by some authority.  He wanted a seal of approval.

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Filed under digital culture, Information and Communication Technology, Living Web, Media, technology, writing

Conference leads for Ted

Possible conference venues for SL paper… Some may be for next year assuming they repeat.

Social Aaspects of Web

Computer Human Interaction fro Managing IT:

Economics and Finance modeling– see mostly the idea of emergence in complex systems.  Thats our emergent layer.

Tools for participation. This one is more about VW as place for collaboration or new forms of community.

ACM Hypertext… They may be only about links now but by next year interworld links will be an issue?

Intntl Conf on Computer Mediated Social Networking

Weblogs and Social Media– isn’t a VW the ultimate social media???

You gotta love any conference with Hawai’i in the title. this is about VW specifically.

Adaptive Hypermedia and Adaptive Web-Based Systems

Any leads?

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Filed under conferences, Information and Communication Technology, innovation, Living Web, New Projects, participatory technology, Research, Social Network Sites, technology, virtual worlds

From the Cyborg Desk: Warning sounded over ‘flirting robots’

Warning sounded over ‘flirting robots’ | Beyond Binary – A blog by Ina Fried – CNET News.com
A program that can mimic online flirtation and then extract personal information from its unsuspecting conversation partners is making the rounds in Russian chat forums, according to security software firm PC Tools.

I hope there is a way to test yourself. Seems further proof that alst year’s sci fi is next year’s sci reality.  Hal must be smiling wherever he slumbers.

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Scholarship 2.0: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

I am not an innovator, but maybe a first or late first adopter.   Of course, it varies by network too. At my university, I seem to be clearly an early adopter of many collaborative technologies (blogs, wikis, virtual worlds).  Anyway, this blog came up and seemed to be worth exploring further as my own scholarly work about Web 2.0/living web also takes on living web forms.

Mitchell Waldrop, coincidentally, is also the author of Complexity which is one of my favorite books and indirectly influenced my choices of scholarly interests in grad school and beyond.

This is a stub until I can look at the blog more.

Scholarship 2.0: An Idea Whose Time Has Come: <strong>Science 2.0</strong>
Scholarship 2.0 is devoted to describing and documenting the forms, facets, and features of alternative Web-based scholarly publishing philosophies and practices. The variety of old and new metrics available for assessing the impact, significance, and value of Web-based scholarship is of particular interest.

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Filed under Living Web, participatory technology, Research, Scholars, science, technology

The Big Question and lots of answers!

 The Big Question

Strangely addictive.   They have questions form anyone, especially young folks.  Different experts post an answer.  Its like a hybrid wikipedia-britannica.

My fave is “How long would it take you to ride a chicken around the world?”

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Filed under digital culture, humor, Living Web, participatory technology, Research

Research Ideas for My Students

Hello folks. This is by no means a comprehensive set of resources. It more reflects sources that seemed to be of interest to two or more of you AND that I thought might not jump out at you as pertinent. It is a mix of search terms, blogs, or alternative media.

EVERYONE should make an appointment with a Bucknell research librarian.

Mob Mentality

□ See Swarm intelligence as a search term. Also this book and tool.

□ See Smart Mobs as a search term. Also, this site and book.

How context shapes roles

Stanford Prison Experiment

How social network effects company

□ Work by Rob Cross

David Krackhardt

David Obstfeld

How brekatoroughs happen…

□ Blogs: Search them for your topics.

Orgtheory http://orgtheory.wordpress.com/

Complexity

Connecetddness

Visiblepath

Terrorism

Saddam Hussein and his network

RAND corporation

Orgnet

Torture:

Experts on torture

A historian of torture

Overview of news on detainees

Financial Bubbles…

Bill Moyers with Kuttner

Interviews with Greenspan

Greespan debate Naomi Klein, a critic (bubbles and feds role comes up)
Fanatic communities

MeetUp

Org theory post

Size of communties

Gore-Tex maker

Advertising

No logo– a critical assessment of advertising and capitalism.

Viral garden blog

Iraq:

Fiasco

Cobra II

Assassin’s Gate

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Filed under activism, Books, digital culture, economic sociology, higher education, Living Web, management, Marketing, national security, Network Dynamics, Org Design, organization studies, pedagogy, Resistance, Social Networks, Terrorism, Viral Marketing

MySpace falls prey to viral phishing

This is the kind of thing that would make any purveyor of SNS software feel his blood start to boil.  If a vibe of authentic, albeit shallow, connecting and socilaizing is ost, then a SNS will die like so many poorly thought through dot.com businesses.  E-toy anyone?

wcbstv.com – Phishers Infiltrate MySpace With Bogus Macy’s Gift Scheme
Social networking giant MySpace stumbled to its knees at the hands of a cyber superbug recently, falling ill to a severe phishing epidemic that is plaguing a vast and vulnerable segment of its membership, wcbstv.com in New York reported Friday.

I have long thought that one of the keys to Facebook’s success was its initial limited availability to those with a .edu domain name in e-mail address.  And the way they grouped people by affiliations.  Spelman college. Check.  Dartmouth.  Check.  Basically Zuckerberg et al leveraged the legitimacy univeristies confer to build their site.  So, myspace should have been very worried about this.  If a SNS is seen as nothing more than a way to get around people’ already very well executed advertisement avoidance strategies, then no matter the quality of content overall, the sense of community will wither and die.

So, Google, myspaces new corporate masters, should be very worried about the barbarian hordes outside their gate.

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Filed under digital culture, Information and Communication Technology, Living Web, Marketing