Category Archives: Org Design

The Schedule Rules- Schedule Reform Ideas for Higher Education (Bucknell)

I have a conflict.  I can’t go.  I have a meeting.  I have to be with my kids.

Read on to take the poll!

These are the various reason why students, staff, and others can not come to various worthy events at Bucknell.  For example, Tuesday nights are the one day without classes at night (lol except Friday, Saturday, and Sunday).  So the Bucknell Forum, as well as others, use Tuesday as the ideal night for these events.  Guess what?  It is also when students schedule their various clubs and organizations including the powerful Greek orgs.

At the same time, I have ahd students avoid 4-5 or 02-5 commitments because of sports practices or games/events.

Meanwhile, no one likes 8 a.m. classes.

And, most weeks there are 2-3 events which I would like to participate in but can’t because they are in the 7-9 at night window when I am with my family.

The schedule rules.  It is not sexy.  It is not “cool” like smart boards in classrooms, service-learning, or student-led expeditions to tag pythons for an ecology class.  However, I suggest that in terms of making life better AND using current resources better (as in more attendance at more events), the schedule is the most over-looked and also most urgent area of reform.

I have imagined various STRUCTURAL changes to the schedule which might help lessen some of these inherent conflicts.   Continue reading

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Filed under higher education, liberal arts, Org Design, Uncategorized

Last Chance to Apply to Be an Obama Organizing Fellow!

Maybe some current or former students check in…

Maybe this campaign is going to be a case study in managerialism in politics married to netroots.  Centrally controlled message and tight finances (managerialism) with people2peole tools and emergent organizing on the ground (netroots).  so, this counts as an OT post also.  :<)

Barack Obama : : Change We Can Believe In | Sam Graham-Felsen’s Blog: Last Chance to Apply to Be an Obama Organizing Fellow!
Today is your last chance to apply to be an Obama Organizing Fellow this summer. This is your opportunity to be on the frontlines of this movement for change, bringing Obama’s message to voters across America, precinct by precinct, block by block…

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Filed under activism, management, Org Design, Orgs Stuff (theory, science, studies), Politics, Power, Activism, Social Networks

Research Ideas for My Students

Hello folks. This is by no means a comprehensive set of resources. It more reflects sources that seemed to be of interest to two or more of you AND that I thought might not jump out at you as pertinent. It is a mix of search terms, blogs, or alternative media.

EVERYONE should make an appointment with a Bucknell research librarian.

Mob Mentality

□ See Swarm intelligence as a search term. Also this book and tool.

□ See Smart Mobs as a search term. Also, this site and book.

How context shapes roles

Stanford Prison Experiment

How social network effects company

□ Work by Rob Cross

David Krackhardt

David Obstfeld

How brekatoroughs happen…

□ Blogs: Search them for your topics.

Orgtheory http://orgtheory.wordpress.com/

Complexity

Connecetddness

Visiblepath

Terrorism

Saddam Hussein and his network

RAND corporation

Orgnet

Torture:

Experts on torture

A historian of torture

Overview of news on detainees

Financial Bubbles…

Bill Moyers with Kuttner

Interviews with Greenspan

Greespan debate Naomi Klein, a critic (bubbles and feds role comes up)
Fanatic communities

MeetUp

Org theory post

Size of communties

Gore-Tex maker

Advertising

No logo– a critical assessment of advertising and capitalism.

Viral garden blog

Iraq:

Fiasco

Cobra II

Assassin’s Gate

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Filed under activism, Books, digital culture, economic sociology, higher education, Living Web, management, Marketing, national security, Network Dynamics, Org Design, organization studies, pedagogy, Resistance, Social Networks, Terrorism, Viral Marketing

Divide and rule – America’s plan for Baghdad and the role of integration

An editorial piece in the left-leaning Independent in the UK documents a new plan for security in Baghdad that will have at least 9 of the 30 districts walled off, gated, with US-Iraqi joint forces controlling security within and between them. ID cards will be issued for each resident, and will be necessary to enter or leave. One of the possibilities within these gated communities is organizational integration of military and civiilan activities. The argument is based on a a reading of the new army Field Manual on counter-insurgency which:

While not specifically advocating the “gated communities” campaign, one of its principles is the unification of civilian and military activities, citing “civil operations and revolutionary development support teams” in South Vietnam, assistance to Kurdish refugees in northern Iraq in 1991 and the “provincial reconstruction teams” in Afghanistan –

This is a cross-fuctional integration. Why would it be a good design? If the task needs of these units or teams require the sharing of tacit infomration, if they have to jointly solve problems with uncertain or unknown solutions, if innovation is a priority. What are other reasons to pursue cross-functional structure?

Why would it be a poor design? Will the effectiveness of both be compromised by being joined? The author suggests that it is not as similar organizational designs failed for the French in Algeria and the Americans in Vietnam. I don’t know the specific history of these, but it is easy to see how the desire to be open and engage with people for civilian projects would be a t odds with the security and fighting concerns of the military.

There is a larger question, hard to divorce from our own domestic politics, of whether the larger gated community idea would work. But, it represents a kind of differentiation of civilian authority and space. Would this also decentralize decision-making for military adn police forces? For various insurgent groups?


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Filed under Iraq, Military, Org Design