Tag Archives: data

Data Collection Aphorism

An anthropology colleague asked me to do a brief explanation of network analysis and theory for a field research class (Thanks Ned Searles!).

One part of teaching I love is when the process of vocalizing ideas leads me to say something I never heard but sounds good.

Today, in discussing the options for types of data, and thinking about survey versus participant observation, I said:

“Data that is easy to collect is not always the data most worth collecting.”

I was thinking about how much of the research grind, especially in an ever bigger and more status-conscious world of publishing we live in, is driven not by good questions, but by available data.

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Filed under pithy expressions, Research, social theory, sociology, words

Network Data Collections

Thanks to a stocnet user, this list of useful network data repositories came along.

I added them to my Diigo list of sna and data.

http://moreno.ss.uci.edu/data.html
http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~snijders/siena/siena_datasets.htm
http://www.eelkeheemskerk.nl/networks/
http://konect.uni-koblenz.de/
http://snap.stanford.edu/data/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/25906481@N07/sets/72157604724106153/
http://www.pfeffer.at/data/cshiring
http://www.gdeltproject.org/
http://www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/tools/data.php

 

 

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Filed under Network Dynamics, Research, Social Networks

Useful Graphic of Stimulus Bill

This is a useful graphic of the elements of the stimulus bill.

To see better, make your view larger by hitting ctrl + in Firefox.  Or, click on link above.

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Filed under Government, policy, Politics, Power, Activism

Micro census data

Not sure how I got on this mailing list, but it seems like fascinating data.  I wonder if it could be used for network research?

IPUMSI-Project Description
The data series includes information on a broad range of population characteristics, including fertility, nuptiality, life-course transitions, migration, labor-force participation, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. The information available in each sample varies according to the questions asked in that year and by differences in post-enumeration processing.

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Filed under macroeconomics, Research, sociology