Tag Archives: innovation

Burritos, Homogeneity of Bites, Marketing and Capitalism

Also on my FB feed…

 

Burrito thought. is there some sort of Burrito aesthetic I don’t know about? That dictates the ingredients be like in strata inside the burrito? Because I’d rather have more mixing. Why not put all ingredients in a bowl (at like an eatery), THEN nix them and then into burrito. More bite similarity across the eating experience.

Very Sporkful question.

 

Comment thread from FB:

(1) Burrito thought. is there some sort of Burrito... - Jordi Sunshine Comas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, several important  themes are here.

1) Why have no burrito joints created this innovation?  are there costs to bowls and cleaning that make it not viable?

2) If people want it, why have the markets not provided what we want?

3) Are there proper aesthetics or culinary philosophies guiding burrito creation and consumption?

 

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Filed under Food, humor, Orgs Stuff (theory, science, studies)

A Clutch of Random Goodies- finance, net neutrality, deficit…

Here is just a clutch of good randomness that has been accumulating on my desktop…

PS featured image is Simon Johnson.

Bucknell and Truth

Bucknell gets unexpected reward for being honest about a mistake.  Is this worthy of an ethical snap?

Net Neutrality?

What the hell is net neutrality?  Baratunde Thurston  one of our tech/no speakers, explains it so well, it got picked up by Raw Story.   I love how Bucknell can be a producer of information and wisdom and not just a user. 

Organization Theory is Cool

A book review about organization theory I really need to read.  Orgtheory.net is the one blog I wish I read more.

Learn from Nice Rich People

Lessons for failure and management from philanthropists.

We are drowning in deficit! (are we?)

Compare your answers to the US public and, um, the reality.

Change Doesn’t Happen.  Until it Does.

From AFL-CO vs Home Depot, through Frank-Dodd, to Citigroup.  Is corporate governance and executive compensation changing?  Maybe.  Read abotu some pretty big changes at the link.

Is a Tax Better than Regulations?

You want policy ideas?  You like finance? You dislike “regulation” that tries to dictate firm behavior?  Try this one.  Instead of trying to tell financial firms what they can or can’t do, how much capital to have on the books, and so on, how about you tax a vice- like we do with alcohol and tobacco- and simply tax financial transactions to make trading for the sake of microscopic gains on immaterial price shifts non-economic?  Read. here about Europe’s experiment with a different, and I would argue,  less intrusive form of regulation to change financial markets and firms.

You want even more financial regulation news?

You are really, really troubled.  I hope Vinny, Loukas, Mike, and… (who else are finance jocks?) are reading this. Simon Johnson.  yes, THAT Simon Johnson, had this blog post about the 12 “angry bankers” of the Fed and their ideas to push for transparency in money market fund valuations as part of the (yes, that same one) Frank Dodd bill reforms that created the systemic risk council.  In a nutshell, the financial industry does NOT WANT such valuation while the regulators do.

I am never surprised when practicing “capitalists” fight against actual free markets (with liquidity and transparency).  Businesspeople are often, perhaps usually anti-capitalist if you define capitalism not as maximum wealth accumulation, but as free markets that expand the prosperity of a society.  Am I alone in seeing this?

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Filed under Business, Government, innovation, macroeconomics, management, organization theory, policy, Political Economy, Politics, Power, Activism, Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship [SiSe]

Stuff to deal with

mad passioante love  https://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/02/21-5

brad delong on nationaliza banks (2008)  http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2008/09/time-not-for-a.html

iceland crisis: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/11/key-lesson-from-iceland-crisis-%E2%80%9Clet-banks-fail%E2%80%9D/

Greek bail out: http://www.businessinsider.com/leaked-memo-blows-the-lid-off-of-the-entire-greek-bailout-2012-2

Innovative ideas: http://blogs.hbr.org/schrage/2011/12/six-innovative-ideas-to-watch.html

Meet the change generation: http://www.fastcompany.com/pics/change-generation#10

Occupy, Fast COmpany: http://www.fastcompany.com/most-innovative-companies/2012/occupy-movement

Kiva concerns: http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/2009/10/kiva-is-not-quite-what-it-seems.php

http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/2009/10/kiva-is-not-quite-what-it-seems.php

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Filed under innovation

Natural Capitalism

I am just now picking up Lovins, Hawken,and Lovins Natural Capitalism book.

I am wondering if I could use it in a module on alternative perspectives on capitalism module. I also was wondering what has happened since it was published in 1999.

There is a is a website called natcap.org.

Here I found a more recent edition with a new introduction. http://www.naturaledgeproject.net/NatCap2005.aspx.

What I like best about it is the focus on solutions. I feel like that would mitigate people who dismiss change as naive idealism.

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Filed under Books, Business, Great Companies, management, Political Economy, social innovation

Finding Journals

For awhile, I have been trying to assemble a list of journal outlets for myself.

If we think back to what journals we follow, I think many might have a similar story to mine.  I recall as an undergrad and in grad school in sociology and management, I would hold in high esteem what professors gave me.  I quickly learned to “read backwards”: to take a new article and glance at the citations (or to look at the intro and lit review) and start taking mental notes of which articles and authors seemed most central.  From this, I had a preliminary list of journals that seemed important.

And those handful of journals I tended to follow more carefully since I already had a toehold in their conversations and streams of discourse.

Meanwhile, keyword searches in article databases exposed me to reading lots of abstracts.  Quickly, I started making snap decisions about journals worth paying attention to and which not.

Since then (1990s), I have the feeling that the number and volume of published material has increased.  Overwhelmed is an understatement.  This is compounded by my own multi-disciplinary interests in networks, social theory, and organization theory.

Finally, I have realized that some of my own writing, if it is ever to see the light of published day, due to approaches or ideas that are out of the mainstream, will need to find journals that will take risks, are in the interstices of academic fields, that consort with subaltern, or embrace eclecticism.

How does one find new journals?  That is the immediate problem.  This morning I tackled this as I wondered who might look at approaches to innovation that are more unconventional.  This often means abandoning the fool’s errand of a quest for the holy grail of The One True Formula for Success™.  I was kind of hoping that maybe I would find the Amazon equivalent of list mania.  You know, you find some new book and you see that other users have made this lovley lists like “Best mashups of Harry Potter and Literary Theory” or “Teen Vampire Stories that Don’t Suck” or “How to make social media work for you.”  I guess I wanted “Journals that Think You, _____________ (insert name), Are Brillant.”

The good orgheads at orgtheory.net tried to make a crowd source list, but it seems to have run aground.

Loet Leysdorf does lots of work of co-citation data to make centrality measures of journals, like this one.

A colleague once gave me  this list that is pretty comprehensive: the Harzing list. I like it since it includes several different quality metrics.

There are lots of outfits that provide various lists and analyses of journals.

But I am looking for a little more editorial content.  Shorter lists that are more targeted and not hide-bound to overly rigid disciplinary boundaries.  More opinion.  More oomph.

Why don’t they seem to exist?  I say this based on two dangerously self-referential observations. 1) I don’t already know about them. 2) 20 minutes of basic web searching failed to turn anything up.  Sociology of Knowledge by the inmates is probably a bad idea, but I can’t help myself.  Maybe they don’t exist because opinion and oomph are not rational career strategies?

For example:

Where can I submit theory articles?

Where can I submit articles on innovation that are interested in inter-disciplinarity?

Mixed method articles?

I’ll start making my own here.

Meanwhile, feel free to post ideas or suggestions below.  Thanks.

 

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Filed under higher education, Research, social theory, sociology

Long Tail Debates

Wish I had more time now to review this:

Long Tail Stops Wagging.

Matt Stoller over at Open Left argues that this means that technoutopian libertarian dreams are dead and there is a necessary role for government.

Maybe.  I have never read enough of the Long Tail arguments to have a Strong opinion, but I do want to point out that there maybe radical inequality in revenues between a Google or Facebook and other web services that aim to make a profit.  In fact, a long tail is premised on that.  But, the question was whether a business can survive in the long tail, as opposed to have equal revenues.  If you have the head and not tail then you have an oligopoly which was never the merit of the long tail.

Finally, aggregators seem complicated.  They get a little revenue from a massive volume of transactions, but if those transactions are distributed to a number of smaller players (ebay, Amazon marketplace, emusic, and so on), then you may have a viable market where one did not exist before- again, it is about viability, not equality.

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Filed under digital culture, management, organization theory, technology

This is Cool- An Innovation Center

Random surfing led to this find: The U MD Innovation center.

Their purpose:

With these imperatives in mind, the Center for Innovation is consulting with and doing research on science and technology in research organizations with the objective of helping them increase scientific technological advances.  The Center is developing theories that concern the process of innovation and the production of knowledge more generally.  Finally, it is developing several models and methods for guiding governments in their evaluations of S&T research.

Then tehy list research tracks:

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Filed under higher education, innovation, Research, technology

Bucknell’s Next Green Steps

I did my presentation yesterday about innovation as it may relate to solutions to global warming.  I’ll get slide share slides up soon.    I annotated my slides in word with links and references.  I wonder how I can get that up and out on line.  Is there any file storage with wordpress?  A link through my own webpage?  Can slide share take a word file and post it?

Here is some news from our Prez, Brian Mitchell, about next steps.  I love the paths, the access to river, and the car and bike borrowing.  At Thursday night’s closing event, I was pleased to make the following announcements:

1.      On behalf of the University, I am signing the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. This commitment, which has been made by more than 475 college presidents across the country, represents the University’s pledge to minimize greenhouse gas emissions, enhance environmental stewardship efforts, and foster the concepts of sustainability and environmental ethics in our curriculum.

2.      To this end, the University is creating a Campus Greening Council that will bring together students, faculty, and staff from across the campus. The Council will evaluate the impact of University policies and practices on the natural environment and the ecology of the campus, including such matters as energy use, air and water emissions, and water resource and waste management. The Council will also conduct periodic environmental audits of the campus. The Bucknell University Environmental Center and its new sustainability coordinator have already completed the first phase of an emissions audit.

3.      Bucknell will take the following steps to protect the natural environment and reduce the University’s ecologic footprint:

·        Consider U.S. Green Building LEED certification for new campus construction costing more than $500,000, subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees and consistent with the University’s campus master plan.

·        Purchase Energy Star products that meet the strict efficiency guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

·        Purchase additional alternative fuel vehicles for the campus fleet.

·        Ask the Campus Greening Council to develop programs in which students, staff, and faculty can “borrow” cars and bicycles from the University to reduce the need for personal vehicles on campus.

·        The Campus Master Plan will include strategies for “greening” the campus, establishing hiking and biking trails that link the University with the larger community, and recapturing access to the Susquehanna River.

These initiatives reflect Bucknell’s historic commitment to protecting the natural environment, educating students about related issues, and using our campus as a place where we can not only learn about, but also implement sustainable environmental practices. The University has been proud for more than 35 years to be a leader in this area. These latest steps carry forward the outstanding example set by those who have come before us.

To learn more about these and other planned initiatives, please read the news release posted at http://www.bucknell.edu/x40046.xml.

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Filed under activism, climate change, higher education, Information and Communication Technology, innovation