Tag Archives: pedagogy

What to make of these questions about teaching?

A survey (HERI) that Bucknell asked me to take included the following question: during the past year have I ever in class…

I can’t imagine a class at a liberal arts class that is not frequently in about all of these?  The fact that the question is asked is odd to me.  Am I that odd?  Are most faculty only lecturing and never asking students to write or do group projects or support arguments?  Who would say not at all to more than a few of these?

 

Frequently Occasionally Not at All
Ask questions in class
Support their opinions with a logical argument
Seek solutions to problems and explain them to others
Revise their papers to improve their writing
Evaluate the quality or reliability of information they receive
Take risks for potential gains
Seek alternative solutions to a problem
Look up scientific research articles and resources
Explore topics on their own, even though it was not required for a class
Accept mistakes as part of the learning process
Seek feedback on their academic work
Work with other students on group projects
Integrate skills and knowledge from different sources and experiences
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Filed under higher education

To Wiki or not to Wiki?

Write this email to Bryan Alexander over at NITLE to see if his input could help me make a quick dicision about “to wiki or not to wiki?”

I am thinking of trying to use a wiki for two projects.

1)      Organize the ever more cluttered and bushy set of resources i would like to draw on in my teaching.  I have been a pack rat for awhile with both print and electronic resources.   When it comes time to dip into this pool to build syllabi, I tend to ignore it as it is hard to access.  I was imagining that a wiki could help me combine tags or a folksonomy with links and some brief commentary.

2)      As a collaborative tool in a class I am about to teach on organization theory.  The plan is to have students and myself educate ourselves on  the financial crisis and work together to find out “what went on.”  I though a wiki could be used to build knowledge and resources.

My university has Blackboard and there is a wiki tool there.

I was wondering if you have any thoughts about wiki tools or platforms.  Is there one good one for academics?  Is there an “industry leader” out there?

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Filed under Living Web, pedagogy, technology

BlogHUD : Get a Second Life Blog

BlogHUD : Get a Second Life Blog – Second Life blogging community network and tools
what is a blogHUD?
The ‘blogHUD’ is a tool to let you blog from Second Life and crosspost your text posts or image postcards to your own blog or photo-sharing account.

This looks like it oculd be a useful tool for undergrads doing on-line ethnography.

Has anyone used it?

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Filed under blogging, Information and Communication Technology, Research, virtual worlds

Miracles and Nasty Surprises

Miracles and Nasty Surprises
This blog is an experiment in presenting an academic work for public commentary. We have taken the web introduction to our book Miracles and Nasty Surprises (found at http://remedy101.com) and converted it into smaller segments. Each segment is available for commentary (call this the talmudic approach).

The authors of the above book used a blog to try and spark discussion. They broke the introduction up into discrete chunks and blogged each chunk.  neat idea.

Possible book for teaching org theory?

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Filed under Books, organization studies, organization theory, pedagogy

A Classroom Path to Entrepreneurship – New York Times

Our own MG 101 is still a pioneer in this.  And they fold in service-learning!

A Classroom Path to Entrepreneurship – New York Times
The course at Monmouth is one of thousands of similar offerings on campuses across the United States. Undergraduate courses in how to start and run a small business are becoming as ubiquitous as Economics 101. Gone is the conventional wisdom that running a small business cannot be learned by sitting in a classroom.

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Filed under higher education, liberal arts, pedagogy